The Artist's Manifesto

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Art history blog by two art history grad students. Art objects spanning all of time and space.

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Jan van Goyen (1596-1665) was a Dutch landscape painter, active during the early 17th century. He is considered one of Holland’s most successful naturalistic landscape painters, completting over 1,200 works in his lifetime. 
 Polder Landscape (1644)

Jan van Goyen (1596-1665) was a Dutch landscape painter, active during the early 17th century. He is considered one of Holland’s most successful naturalistic landscape painters, completting over 1,200 works in his lifetime. 

 Polder Landscape (1644)

Ed Ruscha

Ed Ruscha

Ed Ruscha, The Mountain, 1998, Acrylic on canvas, Private Collection, London. 

Ed Ruscha, The Mountain, 1998, Acrylic on canvas, Private Collection, London. 

Ed Ruscha, Fall All Leaves All Fall, 2009, Acrylic on paper, Gagosian Gallery. 

Ed Ruscha, Fall All Leaves All Fall, 2009, Acrylic on paper, Gagosian Gallery. 

Ed Ruscha, Do as Told or Suffer, 2001, Photogravure and screen print text. 
There is a strong use of contrast between the idyllic landscape and the harsh text of the white blocks and the title quietly printed below the image.  

Ed Ruscha, Do as Told or Suffer, 2001, Photogravure and screen print text. 

There is a strong use of contrast between the idyllic landscape and the harsh text of the white blocks and the title quietly printed below the image.  

From Ed Ruscha’s Country Cityscapes series
It’s Payback Time, 2001, Photogravure with silkscreen text. 
 

From Ed Ruscha’s Country Cityscapes series

It’s Payback Time, 2001, Photogravure with silkscreen text. 

 

Ed Ruscha, Hi, Honey, 1981. 
A quieter yet still effective use of text in the painting. 

Ed Ruscha, Hi, Honey, 1981. 

A quieter yet still effective use of text in the painting. 

Ed Ruscha, Ripe, 1967, Oil on canvas, MoMA. 

Ed Ruscha, Ripe, 1967, Oil on canvas, MoMA. 

Ed Ruscha, Lisp, 1968, Acrylic on canvas. 
There is a juxtaposition between the crisp writing of the word and the high physicality of the word’s action; note the hint of wet spittle in the lower right of the text. 

Ed Ruscha, Lisp, 1968, Acrylic on canvas. 

There is a juxtaposition between the crisp writing of the word and the high physicality of the word’s action; note the hint of wet spittle in the lower right of the text. 

Ed Ruscha, Honk, 1962, Acrylic on paper, Tate Modern. 
The almost onomatopoeia-like quality of the word “honk” is captured in the painting.  

Ed Ruscha, Honk, 1962, Acrylic on paper, Tate Modern. 

The almost onomatopoeia-like quality of the word “honk” is captured in the painting.